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Dictionary Results for slang:
1. WordNet® 3.0 (2006)
slang
    n 1: informal language consisting of words and expressions that
         are not considered appropriate for formal occasions; often
         vituperative or vulgar; "their speech was full of slang
         expressions" [syn: slang, slang expression, slang
         term]
    2: a characteristic language of a particular group (as among
       thieves); "they don't speak our lingo" [syn: slang, cant,
       jargon, lingo, argot, patois, vernacular]
    v 1: use slang or vulgar language
    2: fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted
       everyone"; "You can't fool me!" [syn: gull, dupe,
       slang, befool, cod, fool, put on, take in, put
       one over, put one across]
    3: abuse with coarse language

2. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Sling \Sling\, v. t. [imp. Slung, Archaic Slang; p. p.
   Slung; p. pr. & vb. n. Slinging.] [AS. slingan; akin to
   D. slingeren, G. schlingen, to wind, to twist, to creep, OHG.
   slingan to wind, to twist, to move to and fro, Icel. slyngva,
   sl["o]ngva, to sling, Sw. slunga, Dan. slynge, Lith. slinkti
   to creep.]
   1. To throw with a sling. "Every one could sling stones at an
      hairbreadth, and not miss." --Judg. xx. 16.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To throw; to hurl; to cast. --Addison.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To hang so as to swing; as, to sling a pack.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. (Naut) To pass a rope round, as a cask, gun, etc.,
      preparatory to attaching a hoisting or lowering tackle.
      [1913 Webster]

3. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Slang \Slang\,
   imp. of Sling. Slung. [Archaic]
   [1913 Webster]

4. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Slang \Slang\, n.
   Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory. [Local, Eng.]
   --Holland.
   [1913 Webster]

5. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Slang \Slang\, n. [Cf. Sling.]
   A fetter worn on the leg by a convict. [Eng.]
   [1913 Webster]

6. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Slang \Slang\, n. [Said to be of Gypsy origin; but probably from
   Scand., and akin to E. sling; cf. Norw. sleng a slinging, an
   invention, device, slengja to sling, to cast, slengja kjeften
   (literally, to sling the jaw) to use abusive language, to use
   slang, slenjeord (ord = word) an insulting word, a new word
   that has no just reason for being.]
   Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but
   unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the
   jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low
   popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of
   sailors, etc.
   [1913 Webster]

7. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Slang \Slang\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Slanged; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Slanging.]
   To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar
   language. [Colloq.]
   [1913 Webster]

         Every gentleman abused by a cabman or slanged by a
         bargee was bound there and then to take off his coat
         and challenge him to fisticuffs.         --London
                                                  Spectator.
   [1913 Webster]

8. The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015)
SLANG

   1. R.A. Sibley.  CACM 4(1):75-84 (Jan 1961).

   2. Set LANGuage.  Jastrzebowski, ca 1990.  C extension with
   set-theoretic data types and garbage collection.  "The SLANG
   Programming Language Reference Manual, Version 3.3",
   W. Jastrzebowski , 1990.

   3. Structured LANGuage.  Michael Kessler, IBM.  A language
   based on structured programming macros for IBM 370 assembly
   language.  "Project RMAG: SLANG (Structured Language)
   Compiler", R.A. Magnuson, NIH-DCRT-DMB-SSS-UG105, NIH, DHEW,
   Bethesda, MD 20205 (1980).

   4. "SLANG: A Problem Solving Language for Continuous-Model
   Simulation and Optimisation", J.M. Thames, Proc 24th ACM Natl
   Conf 1969.


9. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906)
SLANG, n.  The grunt of the human hog (_Pignoramus intolerabilis_)
with an audible memory.  The speech of one who utters with his tongue
what he thinks with his ear, and feels the pride of a creator in
accomplishing the feat of a parrot.  A means (under Providence) of
setting up as a wit without a capital of sense.


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