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1. WordNet® 3.0 (2006)
Illinois
    n 1: a midwestern state in north-central United States [syn:
         Illinois, Prairie State, Land of Lincoln, IL]
    2: a member of the Algonquian people formerly of Illinois and
       regions to the west
    3: the Algonquian language of the Illinois and Miami

2. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
Illinois \Il`li*nois"\, n. sing. & pl. (Ethnol.)
   A tribe of North American Indians, which formerly occupied
   the region between the Wabash and Mississippi rivers.
   [1913 Webster]

3. Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856)
ILLINOIS. The name of one of the United States of America. This state was 
admitted into the Union by virtue of a "Resolution declaring the admission 
of the state of Illinois into the Union," passed December 3, 1818, in the 
following words: Resolved, &c. That, whereas, in pursuance of an Act of 
Congress, passed on the eighteenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred 
and eighteen, entitled "An act to enable the people of the Illinois 
territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission 
of such state into the Union, on an equal footing with the original states," 
the people of said territory did, on the twenty-sixth day of August, in the 
present year, by a convention called for that purpose, form for themselves a 
constitution and state government, which constitution and state government, 
so formed, is republican, and in conformity to the principles of the 
articles of compact between the original states and the people and States in 
the territory northwest of the river Ohio, passed on the thirteenth day of 
July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven: Resolved, &c. That the 
state of Illinois shall be one, and is hereby declared to be one, of the 
United States of America, and admitted into the Union on an equal footing 
with the original states, in all respects whatever. 
     2. A constitution for this state, was adopted in convention held at 
Kaskaskia, on the 26th day of August, 1818, which continued in force until 
the first day of April; 1848. A convention to revise the constitution 
assembled at Springfield, June 7, 1847, in pursuance of an act of the 
general assembly of the state of Illinois, entitled "An act to provide for 
the call of a convention: On the first day of August, 1848, this convention 
adopted a constitution of the state of Illinois, and by the 13th section of 
the schedule thereof it provided that this constitution shall be the supreme 
law of the land from and after the first day of April, A. D. 1848. 
     3. It will be proper to consider, 1. The rights of citizens to vote at 
elections. 2. The distribution of the powers of government. 
     4.-1. The sixth article directs that, Sec. 1. In all elections, every 
white male citizen above the age of twenty-one years, having resided in the 
state one year next preceding any election, shall be entitled to vote at 
such election; and every white male inhabitant of the age aforesaid, who may 
be a resident of the state' at the time of the adoption of this 
constitution, shall have the right of voting as aforesaid; but no such 
citizen or inhabitant shall be entitled to vote, except in the district or 
county in which he Shall actually reside lit the time of such election. 
     Sec. 2. All votes shall be given by ballot. 
     Sec. 5. No elector loses his residence in the state by reason of his 
absence on business of the United States, or this state. 
     Sec. 6. No soldier, seaman or mariner of the United States, is deemed a 
resident of the state, in consequence of being stationed within the state. 
     5. The second article distributes the powers of the government as 
follows: 
     Sec. 1. The powers of the government of the state of Illinois shall be 
divided into three distinct departments, and each of them be confided to a 
separate body of magistracy, to wit: Those which are legislative, to one; 
those which are executive, to another; and those which are judicial, to 
another. 
     2. No person, or collection of persons, being one of these departments, 
shall exercise any power properly belonging to either of, the others, except 
as hereinafter expressly directed or permitted; and all acts in 
contravention of this section shall be void. These will be separately 
considered. 
     6. The legislative department will be considered by taking a view, 1. 
Of those parts of the constitution which relate to the general assembly. 2. 
Of the senate. 3. Of the house of representatives. 
     7.-1st. Of the general assembly. The third article of the 
constitution provides as follows 
     Sec. 1. The legislative authority of this state shall be vested in a 
general assembly; which shall consist of a senate and house of 
representatives, both to be elected by the people. 
     Sec. 2. The first election for senators and representatives shall be 
held on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-eight; and thereafter, elections for members of the 
general assembly shall be held once in two years, on the Tuesday next after 
the first Monday in November, in each and every county, at such places 
therein as may be provided by law. 
     Sec. 7. No person elected to the general assembly shall receive any
civil 
appointment within this state, or to the senate of the United States, from 
the governor, the governor and senate, or from the general assembly, during 
the term for which he shall have been elected; and all such appointments, 
and all votes given for any such member for any such office or appointment, 
shall be void; nor shall any member of the general assembly be interested, 
either directly or indirectly, in any contract with the state, or any county 
thereof, authorized by any law passed during the time for which he shall 
have been elected, or during one year after the expiration thereof. 
     Sec. 12. The senate and house of representatives, when assembled, shall 
each choose a speaker and other officers, (the speaker of the senate 
excepted.) Each house shall judge of the qualifications and election of its 
own members, and sit upon its own adjournments. Two-thirds of each house 
shall constitute a quorum but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, 
and compel the attendance of absent members. 
     Sec. 13. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
publish them. The yeas and nays of the members on any question shall, at the 
desire of any two of them, be entered on the journals. 
     Sec. 14. Any two members of either house shall have liberty to dissent 
and protest against any act or resolution which they may think injurious to 
the public, or to any individual, and have the reasons of their dissent 
entered on the journals. 
     Sec. 15. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish 
its members for disorderly behaviour, and, with the concurrence of two-
thirds of all the members elected, expel a member, but not a second time for 
the same cause; and the reason for such expulsion shall be entered upon the 
journal, with the names of the members voting on the question. 
     Sec. 16. When vacancies shall happen in either house, the governor, or 
the person exercising the powers of governor, shall issue writs of election 
to fill such vacancies. 
     Sec. 17. Senators and representatives shall, in all cases, except 
treason, felony or breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during the 
session of the general assembly, and in going to and returning from the same 
and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned 
in any other place. 
     Sec. 18. Each house may punish, by imprisonment during its session, any 
person, not a member, who shall be guilty of disrespect to the house, by any 
disorderly or contemptuous behaviour in their presence: Provided, such 
imprisonment shall not, at any one time, exceed twenty-four hours. 
     Sec. 19. The doors of each house, and of committees of the whole, shall 
be kept open, except in such cases as in the opinion of the house require 
secrecy. Neither house shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for 
more than two days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses 
shall be sitting. 
     8.-2d. Of the senate. The senate will be considered by taking a view 
of, 1. The qualification of senators. 2. Their election. 3. By whom elected. 
4. When elected. 5. Number of senators. 6. The duration of their office. 
     9. First. Art. 3, s. 4, of the Constitution, directs that "No person 
shall be a senator who shall not have attained the age of thirty years; who 
shall not be a citizen of the United States, five years an inhabitant of 
this state, and one year in the county or district in which he shall be 
chosen, immediately preceding his election, if such county or district shall 
have been so long erected; but if not, then within the limits of the county 
or counties, district or districts, out of which the same shall have been 
taken unless he shall have been absent on the public business of the United 
States, or of this state, and shall not, moreover, have paid a state or 
county tax." 
    10. Secondly. The senators at their first session herein provided for, 
shall be divided by lot, as near as can be, into two classes. The seats of 
the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, and 
those of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year; so that one-
half thereof, as near as possible, may be biennially chosen forever 
thereafter. Art. 31 s. 5. 
    11. Thirdly. The senators are elected by the people. 
    12. Fourthly. The first election shall be held on the Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November, 1848; and thereafter the elections shall be on the 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November, once in two years. Art. 3, s. 2. 
    13. Fifthly. The senate shall consist of twenty-five members, and the 
house of representatives shall consist of seventy-five members, until the 
population of the state shall amount to one million. of souls, when five 
members may be added to the house, and five additional members for every 
five hundred thousand inhabitants thereafter, until the whole number of 
representatives shall amount to one hundred; after which, the number shall 
neither be increased nor diminished; to be apportioned among the several 
counties according to the number of white inhabitants. In all future 
apportionments, where more than one county shall be thrown into a 
representative district, all the representatives to which said counties may 
be entitled shall be elected by the entire district. Art. 3, s. 6. 
    14. Sixthly. The senators at their first session herein provided for 
shall be divided by lot, as near as can be, into two classes. The seats of 
the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, and 
those of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, so that one-
half thereof, as near as possible, may be biennially chosen forever 
thereafter. Art. 3, s. 5. 
    15.-3. The house of representatives. This will be considered in the 
same order which has been observed in relation to the senate. 
    16. First. No person shall be a representative who shall not have 
attained the age of twenty-five years; who shall not be a citizen of the 
United States, and three years an inhabitant of this state; who shall not 
have resided within the limits of the county or district in which he shall 
be chosen twelve months next preceding his election, if such county or 
district shall have been so long erected; but if not, then within the limits 
of the county or counties, district or districts, out of which the same 
shall have been taken, unless he shall have been absent on the public 
business of the United States, or of this state; and who, moreover, shall 
not have paid a state or county tax. Art. 3, s. 3. 
    17. Secondly. They are elected biennially. 
    18. Thirdly. Representatives are elected by the people.
    19. Fourthly. Representatives are elected at the same time that senators 
are elected. 
    20. Fifthly. The house of representatives shall consist of seventy-five 
members. See ante, No. 16. 
    21. Sixthly. Their office continues for two years. 
    22.-2. The executive department. The executive power is vested in a 
governor. Art. 4, s. 1. It will be proper to consider, 1. His 
qualifications. 2. His election: 3. The duration of his office. 4. His 
authority and duty. 
    23. First. No person except a citizen of the United States shall be 
eligible to the office of governor, nor shall any person be eligible to that 
office who shall not have attained the age of thirty-five years, and been 
ten years a resident of this state; and fourteen years a citizen of the 
United States. Art. 4 s. 4. 
    24. Secondly. His election is to be on the Tuesday next after the first 
Monday in November. The first election in 1848, and every fourth year 
afterwards. 
    25. Thirdly. He remains in office for four years. The first governor is 
to be installed on the first Monday of January, 1849, and the others every 
fourth; year thereafter. 
    26. Fourthly. His authority and duty. He may give information and 
recommend measures to the legislature, grant reprieves, commutations and 
pardons, except in cases of treason and impeachment, but in these cases he 
may suspend execution of the sentence until the meeting of the legislature, 
require information from the officers of the executive department, and take 
care that the laws be faithfully executed; on extraordinary occasions, 
convene the general assembly by proclamation by commander-in-chief of the 
army and navy of the state, except when they shall be called into the 
service of the United States; nominate, and, by and with the consent and 
advice of the senate, appoint all officers whose offices are established by 
the constitution, or which may be created by law, and whose appointments 
are not otherwise provided for; in case of disagreement between the two 
houses with respect to the time of adjournment, adjourn the general assembly 
to such time as he thinks proper, provided it be not to a period beyond a 
constitutional meeting of the same. Art. 4. He has also the veto power. 
    27. A lieutenant governor shall be chosen at every election of governor, 
in the same manner, continue in office for the same time, and possess the 
same qualifications. In voting for governor and lieutenant governor, the 
electors shall distinguish whom they vote for as governor, and whom as 
lieutenant-governor. Art. 4, s. 14. The following are his principal powers 
and duties 
     Sec. 15. The lieutenant governor shall, by virtue of his office, be 
speaker of the senate, have a right, when in committee of the whole, to 
debate and vote on all subjects, and, whenever the senate are equally 
divided, to give the casting vote. 
     Sec. 16. Whenever the government shall be administered by the 
lieutenant-governor, or he shall be unable to attend as speaker of the 
senate, the senators shall elect one of their own, number as speaker for 
that occasion; and if, during the vacancy of the office of governor, the 
lieutenant governor shall be impeached, removed from his office, refuse to 
qualify, or resign, or die, or be absent from the state, the speaker of the 
senate shall, in like manner, administer the government. 
     Sec. 17. The lieutenant governor, while he acts as speaker of the 
senate, shall receive for his service the same compensation which, shall, 
for the same period, be allowed to the speaker of the house of 
representatives, and no more. 
     Sec. 18. If the lieutenant governor shall be called upon to administer 
the government, and shall, while in such administration, resign, die, or be 
absent from the state, during the recess of the general assembly, it shall 
be the duty of the secretary of state, for the time being, to convene the 
senate for the purpose of choosing a speaker. 
     Sec. 19. In case of the impeachment of the governor, his absence from 
the, state, or inability to discharge the duties of his office, the powers, 
duties, and emoluments of the office shall devolve upon the lieutenant 
governor and in case of his death, resignation, or removal, then upon the 
speaker of the senate for the time being, until the governor, absent or 
impeached, shall return or be acquitted; or until the disqualification or 
inability shall cease; or until a new governor shall be elected and 
qualified. 
     Sec. 20. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor, for any other 
cause than those herein enumerated, or in case of the death of the governor 
elect before he is qualified, the powers, duties, and emoluments of the 
office devolve upon the lieutenant governor, or speaker of the senate, as 
above provided, until a new governor be elected and qualified. 
    28.-3. The judiciary department. The judicial power is vested in one 
supreme court, in circuit courts, in county courts, and in justices of the 
peace; but inferior local courts, of civil and criminal jurisdiction, may be 
established by the general assembly in the cities of the state but such 
courts shall have a uniform organization and jurisdiction in such cities. 
Art. 5, s. 1. These will be separately considered. 
    29.-1st. Of the supreme court, its organization and jurisdiction. 1. 
Of its organization. 1st. The judges must be citizens of the United States; 
have resided in the state five years previous to their respective elections; 
and two years next preceding their election in the division, circuit, or 
county in which they shall respectively be elected; and not be less than 
thirty-five years of age at the time of their election. 2d. The judges are 
elected each one in a particular district, by the people.  But the 
legislature may change the mode of election. 3d. The supreme court consists 
of a chief justice and three associates, any two of whom form a quorum; and 
a concurrence of two of said judges is necessary to a decision. 4th. They 
hold their office for nine years. After the first election, the judges are 
to draw by lot, and one is to go out of office in three, one in six, and the 
other in nine years. And one judge is to be elected every third year. 2. Of 
the jurisdiction of the supreme court. This court has original jurisdiction 
in cases relative to the, revenue, in cases of mandamus, habeas corpus, and 
in such cases of impeachment as may be by law directed to be tried before 
it, and it has appellate jurisdiction in all other cases. 
    30.-2d. Of the circuit courts, their organization and jurisdiction. 
1st. Of their organization. The state is divided into nine judicial 
districts, in each of which a circuit judge, having the same qualifications 
as the supreme judges, except that he may be appointed at the age of thirty 
years, is elected by the qualified electors, who holds his office for six 
years and until his successor shall be commissioned and qualified; but the 
legislature may increase the number of circuits. 2d. Of their jurisdiction. 
The circuit courts have jurisdiction in all cases at law and equity, and in 
all cases of appeals from all inferior courts. 
    31.-3d. Of the county courts. There is in each county a court to be 
called a county court. It is composed of one judge, elected by the people, 
who holds his office for four years. Its jurisdiction extends to all probate 
and such other jurisdiction as the general assembly may confer in civil 
cases, and in such criminal cases as may be prescribed by law, when the 
punishment is by fine only, not exceeding one hundred dollars. The county 
judge, with such justices of the peace in each county as may be designated 
by law, shall hold terms for the transaction of county business, and shall 
perform such other duties as the general assembly shall prescribe; Provided, 
the general assembly may require that two justices, to be chosen by the 
qualified electors of each county, shall sit with the county judge in all 
cases; and there shall be elected, quadrennially, in each county, a clerk of 
the county court, who shall be ex officio recorder, whose compensation shall 
be fees; Provided, the general assembly may, by law, make the clerk of the 
circuit court ex officio recorder, in lieu of the county clerk. 
    32.-4th. Of justices of the peace. There shall be elected in each 
county in this state, in such districts as the general assembly may direct, 
by the qualified electors thereof, a competent number of justices of the 
peace, who shall hold their offices for the term of four years, and until 
their successors shall have been elected and qualified, and who shall 
perform such duties, receive such compensation, and exercise such 
jurisdiction as may be prescribed by law. 



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