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1. WordNet® 3.0 (2006)
at all
    adv 1: in the slightest degree or in any respect; "Are you at
           all interested? No, not at all"; "was not in the least
           unfriendly" [syn: at all, in the least, the least
           bit]

2. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
All \All\, n.
   The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing;
   everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole;
   totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at
   stake.
   [1913 Webster]

         Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all.
                                                  --Shak.
   [1913 Webster]

         All that thou seest is mine.             --Gen. xxxi.
                                                  43.
   [1913 Webster]

   Note: All is used with of, like a partitive; as, all of a
         thing, all of us.
         [1913 Webster]

   After all, after considering everything to the contrary;
      nevertheless.

   All in all, a phrase which signifies all things to a
      person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly;
      altogether.
      [1913 Webster]

            Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee,
            Forever.                              --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]

            Trust me not at all, or all in all.   --Tennyson.
      [1913 Webster]

   All in the wind (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails
      are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake.
      

   All told, all counted; in all.

   And all, and the rest; and everything connected. "Bring our
      crown and all." --Shak.

   At all.
   (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. [Obs.] "She is a
       shrew at al(l)." --Chaucer.
   (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis,
       usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and
       signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or
       to the least extent; in the least; under any
       circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any
       property at all? "Nothing at all." --Shak. "If thy father
       at all miss me." --1 Sam. xx. 6.

   Over all, everywhere. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
      [1913 Webster]

   Note: All is much used in composition to enlarge the meaning,
         or add force to a word. In some instances, it is
         completely incorporated into words, and its final
         consonant is dropped, as in almighty, already, always:
         but, in most instances, it is an adverb prefixed to
         adjectives or participles, but usually with a hyphen,
         as, all-bountiful, all-glorious, allimportant,
         all-surrounding, etc. In others it is an adjective; as,
         allpower, all-giver. Anciently many words, as, alabout,
         alaground, etc., were compounded with all, which are
         now written separately.
         [1913 Webster]

3. The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48
At \At\, prep. [AS. [ae]t; akin to OHG. az, Goth., OS., & Icel.
   at, Sw. [*a]t, Dan. & L. ad.]
   Primarily, this word expresses the relations of presence,
   nearness in place or time, or direction toward; as, at the
   ninth hour; at the house; to aim at a mark. It is less
   definite than in or on; at the house may be in or near the
   house. From this original import are derived all the various
   uses of at. It expresses: 
   [1913 Webster]

   1. A relation of proximity to, or of presence in or on,
      something; as, at the door; at your shop; at home; at
      school; at hand; at sea and on land.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. The relation of some state or condition; as, at war; at
      peace; at ease; at your service; at fault; at liberty; at
      risk; at disadvantage.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. The relation of some employment or action; occupied with;
      as, at engraving; at husbandry; at play; at work; at meat
      (eating); except at puns.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. The relation of a point or position in a series, or of
      degree, rate, or value; as, with the thermometer at
      80[deg]; goods sold at a cheap price; a country estimated
      at 10,000 square miles; life is short at the longest.
      [1913 Webster]

   5. The relations of time, age, or order; as, at ten o'clock;
      at twenty-one; at once; at first.
      [1913 Webster]

   6. The relations of source, occasion, reason, consequence, or
      effect; as, at the sight; at this news; merry at anything;
      at this declaration; at his command; to demand, require,
      receive, deserve, endure at your hands.
      [1913 Webster]

   7. Relation of direction toward an object or end; as, look at
      it; to point at one; to aim at a mark; to throw, strike,
      shoot, wink, mock, laugh at any one.
      [1913 Webster]

   At all, At home, At large, At last, At length, At
   once, etc. See under All, Home, Large, Last (phrase
      and syn.), Length, Once, etc.

   At it, busily or actively engaged.

   At least. See Least and However.

   At one. See At one, in the Vocabulary.
      [1913 Webster]

   Syn: In, At.

   Usage: When reference to the interior of any place is made
          prominent in is used. It is used before the names of
          countries and cities (esp. large cities); as, we live
          in America, in New York, in the South. At is commonly
          employed before names of houses, institutions,
          villages, and small places; as, Milton was educated at
          Christ's College; money taken in at the Customhouse; I
          saw him at the jeweler's; we live at Beachville. At
          may be used before the name of a city when it is
          regarded as a mere point of locality. "An English king
          was crowned at Paris." --Macaulay. "Jean Jacques
          Rousseau was born at Geneva, June, 28, 1712." --J.
          Morley. In regard to time, we say at the hour, on the
          day, in the year; as, at 9 o'clock, on the morning of
          July 5th, in the year 1775.
          [1913 Webster]

Thesaurus Results for At all:

1. Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
anyhow, anyway, anywise, at any cost, at any rate, by any chance, by any means, by merest chance, ever, however, if at all, in any case, in any event, in any way, irregardless, nevertheless, nohow, nonetheless, of any description, of any kind, regardless, soever, whatever, whatsoever
Common Misspellings >
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